Content with tag argonne .

The TTF has compiled a living list of terms deemed inappropriate for use in our organizational areas. For each term we describe why it may be offensive, cite source materials in support, categorize the term by type of bias, and provide replacement suggestions.

It's important to understand why certain terms can be offensive in order to effectively find and replace offensive terms and clarify those that were used appropriately. Some terms should never be used, while others can be appropriate in the right context; in these cases, it helps to use precise language.

Terminology List

Term Replacement Bias Context Source
aboriginal Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur Using the term "Aboriginal", Indigenous Peoples are situated solely by their political-legal relationship to the state rather than by any cultural or social ties to their Indigenous community and culture. Social Justice Synonyms #12: Indigenous Identity and Terminology
abort Cancel Process, End Process Gender Bias May evoke violent images, religious objections None
addicted hooked, devoted Disability Bias May case harm t those who are experiencing drug addition, or are in recovery, or have friends/relatives who have experienced addiction None
American US Citizen Implicit Bias When we talk about "Americans" in the United States, we're usually just referring to people from the United States. This erases other cultures and depicts the United States as the dominant American country. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7293311/University-determines-saying-America-not-offensive-calling-straight-male-is.html
basket case nervous Disability Bias The term originally referred to a person, usually a soldier from World War I, who has lost all four limbs. Inclusive Language Guide
birth defect congenital disability Disability Bias The word defect implies a person is sub-par or somehow incomplete Inclusive Language Guide
black box Opaque box Implicit Bias The phrases didn't originate in times of slavery, but the use of "black" to describe things is subconsciously racialized CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
black mark Demerit Implicit Bias Assigns negative connotations to the color black.The phrase didn't originate in slavery, but the use of black to describe value is subconsiously racialized Huffington Post
blackball Deny Implicit Bias The term implies wrongdoing. If you bear a black mark, you've done something that people hold against you. CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
blacklist(ed) Disallowed Implicit Bias The term implies wrongdoing. If you've been blackballed, you've been banned from joining an organization because of something you've done. CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
blind review Anonymous review, Redacted Review Disability Bias May be offensive to those with visual disabilities. When we use metaphors like "blind study," we unintentionally perpetuate the abnormality and negativity of impairment, furthering an ableist culture. An End to "Blind Review"
blind Study Anonymous study, Redacted Study Disability Bias May be offensive to those with visual disabilities. When we use metaphors like "blind review," we unintentionally perpetuate the abnormality and negativity of impairment, furthering an ableist culture. An End to "Blind Review"
brown bag Lunch and learn
Tech talks
Implicit Bias The term traces back to the "brown paper bag test," wherein servants/butlers would gauge a person's whiteness by comparing their skin tone with a brown bag before determining if they could enter a private residence. Don't Call It a ‘Brown Bag Lunch': Seattle Frowns on Popular Term
cake walk Easy Implicit Bias The cakewalk originated as a dance performed by enslaved Black people on plantations before the Civil War. It was intended to be a mockery of the way White people danced, though plantation owners often interpreted slaves' movements as unskillful attempts to be like them. Owners held contests in which enslaved people competed for a cake. Later, the dance -- and the idiom -- was popularized through minstrel shows, characterized by a "a high-leg prance with a backward tilt of the head, shoulders and upper torso." CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
chief Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur Calling an Indigenous person "chief" is offensive. It's a nickname that reduces a person solely to race. 7 things you should never say to a Native American
colored Person of Color Ethnic Slur Highly offensive slur used during segregation to separate people of color from whites only amenities and opportunities Inclusive Language Guide
crazy Surprising/wild Disability Bias Offensive terms related to mental illness Inclusive Language Guide
cretin None Ethnic Bias Though most people use the word "cretin" to refer to someone that is "insensitive" or "stupid," Merriam-Webster writes that the word used to refer to those who lives in the French-Swiss Alps, and were affected with hypothyroidism. Business Insider: 12 racist and offensive phrases that people still use all the time
cripple disabled person Disability Bias Derogatory term used for a person with a physical Disability Bias restricting the use of extremities, particularly the legs. NDA: Appropriate Terms to Use
dumb person who cannot speak Disability Bias Once widely used to describe a person who could not speak and implied the person was incapable of expressing themselves Inclusive Language Guide
dummy value Placeholder value
Sample value
Disability Bias Once widely used to describe a person who could not speak and implied the person was incapable of expressing themselves Twitter Stops Using Terms 'Master,' 'Slave' and 'Blacklist'
eeny meeny miney moe randomly selected Institutional Racism Song in which the original version uses racial language and refers to the slave hunts conducted to find runaway slaves Business Insider: 12 racist and offensive phrases that people still use all the time
Eskimo Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur Although the name "Eskimo" was commonly used in Alaska to refer to Inuit and Yupik people of the world, this usage is now considered unacceptable by many or even most Alaska Natives, largely since it is a colonial name imposed by non-Indigenous people Inuit or Eskimo: Which name to use?
fell on deaf ears didn't listen Disability Bias Terminology may be offensive to those within the deaf community. Indicates that the disability makes the person less able None
first class citizens Core Feature, top level Implicit Bias Socially charged term Google Developers
flow master (Kanban) flow manager Institutional Racism Use of master may convey a sense of superiority, and may have negative historical context Words Matter: Finally, Tech Looks at Removing Exclusionary Language
freshman First year Gender Bias Reinforces a language that already privileges men Inclusive Language Guide
fuzzy-wuzzy None Implicit Bias This is a derogatory term used by British colonial soldiers to refer to the hair of a nomadic tribe in East Africa. 7 Racist Slurs Which You Should Drop From Your Vocabulary
gender Biased Terminology one ..., a person ..., Gender Bias Pronouns are an important part of how we identify that deserves to be respected. Assuming someone's gender can be hurtful, especially to members of our community who are transgender, genderqueer, or non-binary. Business Insider: What you should know about gender pronouns, how to use them, and why they're important
Gender Biased Terminology, pronouns etc they/them/theirs Gender Bias Pronouns are an important part of how we identify that deserves to be respected. Assuming someone's gender can be hurtful, especially to members of our community who are transgender, genderqueer, or non-binary. Business Insider: What you should know about gender pronouns, how to use them, and why they're important
ghetto refer to the name of the neighborhood Implicit Bias Often used to indicated any socially segregated non-white urban neighborhood Inclusive Language Guide
gimp, gimpy, gimped None Disability Bias The noun gimp is sometimes used to describe a limp or another physical disability, although it's an outdated and offensive word to use. Gimp was first used in the 1920's, possibly as a combination of limp and gammy, an old slang word for "bad." Viscardi Center
grandfathered in exempt, legacy status Institutional Racism refers to the "grandfather clause" adopted by seven Southern states during the Reconstruction Era. This allowed those states to deny voting rights to blacks NPR: The Racial History Of The 'Grandfather Clause'
gray beard Individual's name Ageism Older, more experienced IT or cybersecurity personality. One sought after for wisdom born from study and experience over a lifetime. None
gray hat hacker hacktivist Ageism Older, more experienced IT or cybersecurity personality. One sought after for wisdom born from study and experience over a lifetime. None
guys folks, people, you all, y'all, everyone Gender Bias Reinforces a language that already privileges men Instead Of Saying 'Hey, Guys!' At Work, Try These Gender-Neutral Alternatives
gyp cheat Ethnic Slur A term derived from the Romani gypsies which made a stereotype that all Romani were thieves, cheaters, or liars Business Insider
half-breed Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur Offensive to those of mixed heritage Inclusive Language Guide
handicapped person with a disability Disability Bias term generalizes the population and minimizes personhood, implying that people with disabilities ar not capable Inclusive Language Guide
hip-hip hurray hooray, yay Institutional Racism Anti-semitic. It comes from "Hep-Hep," the origin of which was Latin: "Hieroslyma est perdita" for "Jerusalem has fallen." The Hep-Hep riots involved the lynching of thousands of Jews. 7 Racist Slurs Which You Should Drop From Your Vocabulary
Hispanic Latinx, Use person's country of origin Ethnic Slur problematic when people are called Hispanic based on their name or appearnce without first checking to see how they identify Inclusive Language Guide
homosexual It is impotant to ask what term a person prefers and not assign them arbitrarily Sexual Bias Offensive toerm to suggest that gay people are not normal or are psychologically/emotionally disordered None
hooligan troublemaker Ethnic Slur Slur used to refer to Irish people as unruly or destructive Business Insider
illegal immigrant/alien undocumented immigrant Ethnic Slur Saying that a person is illegal dehumanizes them and implies that they are criminals without taking into account their status Inclusive Language Guide
Indian Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur The term indian in the US is associated with Columbus, who mistakenly labeled the Indigenous people of the Americas as Indians. It is considered an ethnic slur. Social Justice Synonyms #12: Indigenous Identity and Terminology
jew down haggle, bargain Ethnic Slur The term to "Jew down" was born out of stereotypes formed during medieval times about Jews being cheap or prone to hoard money. Often they were forced into financial occupations and thus were best known as money lenders, leaving them vulnerable to anti-Semitic misrepresentations. What does ‘Jew down' mean, and why do people find it offensive?
lynch mob unjust attack Institutional Racism lynch mobs originated as hordes of people, most always White, who'd torture and kill Black people -- often by hanging them -- as a form of vigilante justice. CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
Male or Female connectors and fasteners plug/socket connectors Gender Bias References to Gender Bias The Register
man hours person hours Gender Bias Reinforces a language that already privileges men Twitter Engineering
man hours effort hours Gender Bias Reinforces a language that already privileges men Twitter Engineering
master manager Institutional Racism References which have historical context regarding oppression of a group of people. Masters controlled those people and made them slaves, unable to exercise free will or be considered human Washington Post: Opinion: There's an industry that talks daily about ‘masters' and ‘slaves.' It needs to stop.
master / slave Use whatever replacement that vendor/provider uses in their docs Institutional Racism References which have historical context regarding oppression of a group of people. Masters controlled those people and made them slaves, unable to exercise free will or be considered human Washington Post: Opinion: There's an industry that talks daily about ‘masters' and ‘slaves.' It needs to stop.
master branch main branch Institutional Racism References which have historical context regarding oppression of a group of people. Masters controlled those people and made them slaves, unable to exercise free will or be considered human Washington Post: Opinion: There's an industry that talks daily about ‘masters' and ‘slaves.' It needs to stop.
minority Native American
African American
or the general term "people of color" when referring to racial or ethnic communities.
Institutional Racism The term "minority" has come to be seen as a generalized term for "the other." Also, the use of "minority" implies a "less than" attitude toward the community or communities being discussed. Instead, use either community-specific terms (e.g., "Native American," "African American," etc.) or the general term "people of color" when referring to racial or ethnic communities. Speaking and Writing About Diversity
mob or mob programming Team, swarm, troop Ethnic Bias Mobs originated as hordes of people, most always White, who'd torture and kill Black people . Mob has also been linked to stereotypes regarding Italians. CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
native indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur The use of these words to refer to an Indigenous person today reflects colonial and racist practices, as it invokes images of savagery and barbarism. Social Justice Synonyms #12: Indigenous Identity and Terminology
native feature built in Ethnic Bias The use of these words to refer to an Indigenous person today reflects colonial and racist practices, as it invokes images of savagery and barbarism. https://developers.google.com/style/word-list - native
native speaker/non-native speaker English as a primary language, English as a secondary language (ESL) Ethnic Bias The use of these words to refer to an Indigenous person today reflects colonial and racist practices, as it invokes images of savagery and barbarism. https://developers.google.com/style/word-list - native
Nazi rigid, rule abiding Ethnic Slur A group of people who discrimated against all but the Aryian race. It is particulary offensive to people who are part of the Jewish religion because so many Jews were killed horrifically. None
nitty-gritty details, specifics Ethnic Bias Some scholars believe this was a euphemism for the N-word, originating from the lower decks of ships used to transport enslaved people across the Atlantic Ocean 7 Racist Slurs Which You Should Drop From Your Vocabulary
no can do I can't do it Ethnic Bias The widespread use of the phrase in English today has obscured its origin: what might seem like folksy, abbreviated version of I can't do it is actually an imitation of Chinese Pidgin English. The phrase dates from the mid-19th to early-20th centuries, an era when Western attitudes towards the Chinese were markedly racist. Common Words and Phrases That Have Seriously Racist Roots
off the reservation None Ethnic Bias Native American peoples were restricted to reservations created by the U.S. government, and their freedom was severely limited by the terms of the treaties they were often forced to sign. NPR: Should Saying Someone Is 'Off The Reservation' Be Off-Limits?
paddy wagon police car Ethnic Bias a term originated after the draft riots of 1863 when police cars were used to arrest the economically poor Irish Americans who resisted the draft Business Insider
pow wow Huddle
Standup
discussion
Ethnic Bias Pow wows are social gatherings for ceremonial and celebratory purposes and are conducted under strict protocol. Using this phrase to refer to a quick business meeting denigrates the long, cultural significance of the pow wow. Use these culturally offensive phrases, questions at your own risk
red skins Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur Ethnic slur, offensive to Indigenous people Social Justice Synonyms #12: Indigenous Identity and Terminology
red team cyber offense Ethnic Bias The use of color to denote values may be offensive to some ethnic groups. The Colors Of Cybersecurity
rule of thumb standard or general rule Gender Bias The rule of thumb derived from English law which allowed a man to beat his wife with a stick so long as it was no thicker than his thumb Inclusive Language Guide
sanity check Quick check, Confidence Check, Coherence Check Disability Bias May be offensive to those with mental health issues. Unconscious Bias in Computer Science
savage Indigenous people/peoples or By an individual's Nation or community, ie. "Cree", "Musqueam", "Squamish", "Mohawk", etc. (ie. My friend is Musqueam and speaks hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓.) Ethnic Slur The use of these words to refer to an Indigenous person today reflects colonial and racist practices, as it invokes images of savagery and barbarism. Social Justice Synonyms #12: Indigenous Identity and Terminology
scrum master Agile Lead
Agile Program Manager
Agile Coach
Agile Team Facilitator
Scrum Coach
Scrum Teacher
Scrum Leader
Scrum Facilitator
Servant Leader
Scrum Custodian
Institutional Racism References which have historical context regarding oppression of a group of people. Masters controlled those people and made them slaves, unable to exercise free will or be considered human Words Matter: Finally, Tech Looks at Removing Exclusionary Language
servant producer Institutional Racism The word servant serves to perpetuate a mindset that allows one person to be considered completely inferior to another because of the lowliness of their job. There can be no sense of equality between a servant and their employer, just as there can be no sense of equality between a slave and their master. Coconutshongkong
slave worker Institutional Racism a person who is the legal property of another and is forced to obey them. Washington Post
sold down the river betrayed Institutional Racism refers to unruly slaves being literally sold into slavery at places along the waterways CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
spirit animal none Ethnic Bias Cultural appropriation and disrespect of signs which carry religious signifcance. 7 Racist Slurs Which You Should Drop From Your Vocabulary
submit process Implicit Bias The dictionary term means to give or offer something for a decision to be made by others. However, due to some discussions within religious communities, submit can be taken in the context of allowing others to have power over you. Additionally, submission is a topic of discussion within some communities, resulting in a word that may have multiple meanings according to culture. None
tarbaby difficult problem Ethnic Slur The term tar baby is most commonly used to refer to a difficult problem that is only aggravated by attempts to solve it, alluding to an incident in Joel Chandler Harris's Uncle Remus (1881). The use as a racial slur arose by the 1940s, and because of its highly offensive nature, the original meaning is now often regarded as offensive by association None
tarball tar file, tar archive, tar bundle Ethnic Bias The use of the term tarball can have negative connotations to people of color unaware of the acronym associated None
tone deaf unenlightened Disability Bias May be offensive to those with hearing difficulties medium.com
tribal knowledge institutional knowledge Ethnic Bias Cultural appropriation and disrespect of signs which carry religious signifcance. None
uppity arrogant Institutional Racism Used to refer to a black person who didn't know their place CNN: Everyday words and phrases that have racist connotations
user * customer Implicit Bias The phrase is criticised for its negative connotations and outdated use, and many argue that is has no place in a modern UX terminology or in broader business language. UX terminology: Is it time we dropped the term ‘users'?
war room security incident room, situation room, project management room Implicit Bias The term war room is derived from the military and was first used in 1901. This was a room used by the military to meet and plan war strategy. Using this term may evoke tragedy that can be problematic to survivors of war or veterans Inclusive Language Guide
webmaster, web master Web product owner Institutional Racism References which have historical context regarding oppression of a group of people. Masters controlled those people and made them slaves, unable to exercise free will or be considered human None
white hat / black hat ethical actor / bad actor Implicit Bias Assigns value connotations based on color.The phrase didn't originate in slavery, but the use of color to describe value is subconsiously racialized Unconscious Bias in Computer Science
white paper position paper, publication, report Implicit Bias Assigns value connotations based on color.The phrase didn't originate in slavery, but the use of color to describe value is subconsiously racialized Reference to colors in terms of value inappropriate (see urban dictionary)
white team cyber exercise cell Implicit Bias Assigns value connotations based on color.The phrase didn't originate in slavery, but the use of color to describe value is subconsiously racialized The Colors Of Cybersecurity
whitelist(ed) allowed Implicit Bias Assigns value connotations based on color.The phrase didn't originate in slavery, but the use of color to describe value is subconsiously racialized ‘Whitelist,' ‘Blacklist': The New Debate Over Security Terminology
yellow team DevSecOps team Implicit Bias Assigns value connotations based on color.The phrase didn't originate in slavery, but the use of color to describe value is subconsiously racialized and may be offesnsive to an East or southeast Asian person, in reference to those who have a yellowish skin color. The Colors Of Cybersecurity

Suggestion Form

The Terminology List is an evolving document. We encourage you to reach out to the XSEDE Terminology Task Force with any feedback, recognizing that some third-party materials may be beyond our editorial control.

XSEDE Terminology Suggestion Form


Terminology at XSEDE

Words matter! XSEDE's commitment to fostering and promoting an inclusive environment for all users, staff, and the wider community extends to all language and terminology in all of our materials. As a result of this commitment, XSEDE's Terminology Task Force (TTF) was formed to review, address, and define processes to eliminate offensive terms in our materials.


Current Campus Champions

Current Campus Champions listed by institution. Participation as either an Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) or as a minority-serving institution (MSI) is also indicated.

Campus Champion Institutions  
Total Academic Institutions 301
     Academic institutions in EPSCoR jurisdictions 80
    Minority Serving Institutions 57
    Minority Serving Institutions in EPSCoR jurisdictions 17
Non-academic, not-for-profit organizations 36
Total Campus Champion Institutions 337
Total Number of Champions 720

LAST UPDATED: May 3, 2021

Click here to see a big map with a legend.

See also the lists of Leadership Team and Regional LeadersDomain Champions and Student Champions.

Institution Campus Champions EPSCoR MSI
AIHEC (American Indian Higher Education Consortium) Russell Hofmann    
Alabama A & M University Damian Clarke, Raziq Yaqub, Georgiana Wright (student)
Albany State University Olabisi Ojo  
Arizona State University Michael Simeone (domain) , Sean Dudley, Johnathan Lee, Lee Reynolds, William Dizon, Ian Shaeffer, Dalena Hardy, Gil Speyer, Richard Gould, Chris Kurtz, Jason Yalim, Philip Tarrant, Douglas Jennewein, Marisa Brazil, Rebecca Belshe, Eric Tannehill, Zachary Jetson    
Arkansas State University Hai Jiang  
Austin Peay State University Justin Oelgoetz    
Bates College Kai Evenson  
Baylor College of Medicine Pavel Sumazin , Hua-Sheng Chiu, Hyunjae Ryan Kim    
Baylor University Mike Hutcheson, Carl Bell, Brian Sitton    
Bentley University Jason Wells    
Bethune-Cookman University Ahmed Badi  
Boise State University Kyle Shannon, Jason Watt, Kelly Byrne, Mendi Edgar, Mike Ramshaw  
Boston Children's Hospital Arash Nemati Hayati    
Boston College Simo Goshev    
Boston University Wayne Gilmore, Charlie Jahnke, Augustine Abaris, Brian Gregor, Katia Bulekova, Josh Bevan    
Bowdoin College Dj Merrill , Stephen Houser  
Bowie State University Konda Karnati  
Brandeis University John Edison    
Brown University Helen Kershaw, Maximilian King, Paul Hall, Khemraj Shukla, Mete Tunca, Paul Stey, Rohit Kakodkar  
California Baptist University Linn Carothers  
California Institute of Technology Tom Morrell    
California State Polytechnic University-Pomona Chantal Stieber    
California State University - Fullerton Justin Tran    
California State University-Sacramento Anna Klimaszewski-Patterson  
California State University-San Bernardino Dung Vu, James MacDonell  
Carnegie Institution for Science Floyd A. Fayton, Jr.    
Carnegie Mellon University Bryan Webb, Franz Franchetti, Carl Skipper    
Case Western Reserve University Roger Bielefeld, Hadrian Djohari, Emily Dragowsky, James Michael Warfe, Sanjaya Gajurel    
Central State University Mohammadreza Hadizadeh  
Centre College David Toth  
Chapman University James Kelly    
Children's Mercy Kansas City Shane Corder    
Claremont Graduate University Michael Espero (student), Cindy Cheng (student)    
Claremont McKenna College Jeho Park, Zeyad Elkelani (student)    
Clark Atlanta University Dina Tandabany  
Clarkson Univeristy Jeeves Green, Joshua A. Fiske    
Clemson University Xizhou Feng, Corey Ferrier, Tue Vu, Asher Antao, Grigorio Yourganov  
Cleveland Clinic, The Iris Nira Smith, Daniel Blankenberg    
Clinton College Terris S. Riley
Coastal Carolina University Will Jones, Thomas Hoffman  
Colby College Randall Downer  
Colgate University Howard Powell, Dan Wheeler    
College of Charleston Ray Creede  
College of Staten Island CUNY Sharon Loverde  
College of William and Mary Eric Walter    
Colorado School of Mines Torey Battelle, Nicholas Danes    
Columbia University Rob Lane, George Garrett    
Columbia University Irving Medical Center Vinod Gupta    
Complex Biological Systems Alliance Kris Holton    
Cornell University Susan Mehringer    
Dakota State University David Zeng  
Davidson College Neil Reda (student), Michael Blackmon (student)    
Dillard University Tomekia Simeon, Brian Desil (student), Priscilla Saarah (student)
Doane University-Arts & Sciences Mark Meysenburg, AJ Friesen  
Dominican University of California Randall Hall    
Drexel University David Chin, Cameron Fritz (student), Hoang Oanh Pham (student)    
Duke University Tom Milledge    
Earlham College Charlie Peck    
East Carolina University Nic Herndon    
East Tennessee State University David Currie, Janet Keener, Vincent Thompson    
Edge, Inc. Forough Ghahramani    
Emory University Jingchao Zhang    
Federal Reserve Bank Of Kansas City (CADRE) BJ Lougee, Chris Stackpole, Michael Robinson    
Federal Reserve Bank Of Kansas City (CADRE) - OKC Branch Greg Woodward  
Federal Reserve Bank Of New York Ernest Miller, Kevin Kelliher    
Felidae Conservation Fund Kevin Clark    
Ferris State University Luis Rivera, David Petillo    
Florida A and M University Hongmei Chi, Jesse Edwards, Yohn Jairo Parra Bautista, Rodolfo Tsuyoshi F. Kamikabeya (student), Emon Nelson (student)  
Florida Atlantic University Rhian Resnick    
Florida International University David Driesbach, Cassian D'Cunha  
Florida Southern College Christian Roberson    
Florida State University Paul van der Mark    
Francis Marion University K. Daniel Brauss, Jordan D. McDonnell
Franklin and Marshall College Jason Brooks    
GPN (Great Plains Network) Kate Adams, James Deaton    
George Mason University Jayshree Sarma, Alastair Neil, Berhane Temelso, Swabir Silayi    
George Washington University Hanning Chen, Adam Wong, Glen Maclachlan, William Burke    
Georgetown University Alisa Kang    
Georgia Institute of Technology Mehmet Belgin, Semir Sarajlic, Nuyun (Nellie) Zhang, Sebastian Kayhan Hollister (student), Kevin Manalo, Siddhartha Vemuri (student)    
Georgia Southern University Brandon Kimmons, Dain Overstreet    
Georgia State University Neranjan "Suranga" Edirisinghe Pathiran, Ken Huang, Thakshila Herath (student), Melchizedek Mashiku (student)  
Grinnell College Michael Conner    
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology Daqing Yun    
Harvard Medical School Jason Key    
Harvard University Scott Yockel, Plamen Krastev, Francesco Pontiggia    
Harvey Mudd College Aashita Kesarwani    
Hood College Xinlian Liu    
Howard University Marcus Alfred, Christina McBean (student), Tamanna Joshi (student)  
I-Light Network & Indiana Gigapop Caroline Weilhamer, Marianne Chitwood    
Idaho National Laboratory Ben Nickell, Eric Whiting, Kit Menlove  
Idaho State University Keith Weber, Dong Xu, Kindra Blair, Jack Bradley  
Illinois Institute of Technology Jeff Wereszczynski    
Indiana University Abhinav Thota, Sudahakar Pamidighantam (domain) , Junjie Li, Thomas Doak (domain) , Carrie L. Ganote, Sheri Sanders (domain) , Bhavya Nalagampalli Papudeshi, Le Mai Weakley, Ashley Brooks (student)    
Indiana University of Pennsylvania John Chrispell    
Internet2 Dana Brunson, Cathy Chaplin, John Hicks, Tim Middelkoop    
Iowa State University Andrew Severin, James Coyle, Levi Baber    
Jackson State University Carmen Wright, Duber Gomez-Fonseca (student)
James Madison University Isaiah Sumner    
Jarvis Christian College Widodo Samyono  
John Brown University Jill Ellenbarger  
Johns Hopkins University Anthony Kolasny, Jaime Combariza, Jodie Hoh (student)    
Juniata College Burak Cem Konduk    
KanREN (Kansas Research and Education Network) Casey Russell  
Kansas State University Dan Andresen, Mohammed Tanash (student), Kyle Hutson  
Kennesaw State University Ramazan Aygun    
Kentucky State University Chi Shen
Lafayette College Bill Thompson, Jason Simms, Peter Goode    
Lamar University Larry Osborne    
Lane College Elijah MacCarthy  
Langston University Franklin Fondjo, Abebaw Tadesse, Joel Snow
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Andrew Wiedlea    
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Todd Gamblin    
Lehigh University Alexander Pacheco    
Lipscomb University Michael Watson    
Lock Haven University Kevin Range    
Louisiana State University Feng Chen, Blaise A Bourdin  
Louisiana State University - Alexandria Gerard Dumancas  
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans Mohamad Qayoom  
Louisiana Tech University Don Liu  
Marquette University Craig Struble, Lars Olson, Xizhou Feng    
Marshall University Jack Smith  
Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center Julie Ma, Abigail Waters (student)    
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Christopher Hill, Lauren Milechin    
Medical University of South Carolina Starr Hazard  
Miami University - Oxford Jens Mueller    
Michigan State University Andrew Keen, Yongjun Choi, Dirk Colbry, Justin Booth, Dave Dai, Arthur "Chip" Shank II, Brad Fears    
Michigan Technological University Gowtham    
Middle Tennessee State University Dwayne John    
Midwestern State University Eduardo Colmenares-Diaz    
Minnesota State University - Mankato Maria Kalyvaki    
Mississippi State University Trey Breckenridge  
Missouri State University Matt Siebert    
Missouri University of Science and Technology Buddy Scharfenberg, Don Howdeshell    
Monmouth College Christopher Fasano    
Montana State University Jonathan Hilmer  
Montana Tech Bowen Deng  
Morgan State University James Wachira  
NCAR/UCAR Davide Del Vento    
National University Ali Farahani    
Navajo Technical University Jason Arviso
New Jersey Institute of Technology Glenn "Gedaliah" Wolosh, Roman Voronov    
New Mexico State University Alla Kammerdiner, Diana Dugas, Strahinja Trecakov
New York University Shenglong Wang    
Noble Research Institute, LLC Nick Krom, Perdeep Mehta  
North Carolina A & T State University Ling Zu  
North Carolina Central University Caesar Jackson, Alade Tokuta  
North Carolina State University at Raleigh Lisa Lowe, Yuqing Du (student)    
North Dakota State University Dane Skow, Nick Dusek, Oluwasijibomi "Siji" Saula, Khang Hoang  
Northeastern University Scott Valcourt    
Northern Arizona University Christopher Coffey, Jason Buechler, William Wilson    
Northern Illinois University Jifu Tan    
Northwest Missouri State University Jim Campbell    
Northwestern State University (Louisiana Scholars' College) Brad Burkman  
Northwestern University Pascal Paschos, Alper Kinaci, Sajid Ali (student)    
OWASP Foundation Learning Gateway Project Bev Corwin, Laureano Batista, Zoe Braiterman, Noreen Whysel    
Ohio Supercomputer Center Karen Tomko, Keith Stewart, Sandy Shew    
Oklahoma Baptist University Yuan-Liang Albert Chen  
Oklahoma Innovation Institute John Mosher  
Oklahoma State University Brian Couger (domain) , Jesse Schafer, Christopher J. Fennell (domain) , Phillip Doehle, Evan Linde, Venkat Padmanapan Rao (student), Bethelehem Ali Beker (student)  
Old Dominion University Wirawan Purwanto    
Oral Roberts University Stephen R. Wheat  
Oregon State University David Barber, CJ Keist, Mark Keever, Dylan Keon, Mckenzie Hughes (student)    
Penn State University Chuck Pavloski, Wayne Figurelle, Guido Cervone, Diego Menendez, Jeff Nucciarone    
Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center Stephen Deems, John Urbanic    
Pomona College Andrew Crawford, Omar Zintan Mwinila-Yuori (student), Samuel Millette (student), Sanghyun Jeon, Nathaniel Getachew (student)    
Portland State University William Garrick    
Prairie View A&M University Suxia Cui, Racine McLean (student), Kobi Tioro (student), Chara Tatum (student), Virgie Leyva (student)  
Princeton University Ian Cosden    
Purdue University Xiao Zhu, Tsai-wei Wu, Matthew Route (domain) , Eric Adams    
RAND Corporation Justin Chapman    
RENCI Laura Christopherson, Chris Erdmann, Chris Lenhardt    
Reed College Trina Marmarelli, Johnny Powell , Ben Poliakoff, Jiarong Li (student)    
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Joel Giedt, James Flamino (student)    
Rhodes College Brian Larkins    
Rice University Qiyou Jiang, Erik Engquist, Xiaoqin Huang, Clinton Heider, John Mulligan    
Rochester Institute of Technology Andrew W. Elble , Emilio Del Plato, Charles Gruener, Paul Mezzanini, Sidney Pendelberry    
Rowan University Ghulam Rasool    
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SBGrid Consortium      
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San Diego State University Mary Thomas  
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Sonoma State University Mark Perri  
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Southeast Missouri State University Marcus Bond    
Southern Connecticut State University Yigui Wang    
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The University of Tennessee-Chattanooga Carson Woods (student), Tony Skjellum    
The University of Texas at Austin Kevin Chen    
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University of Arkansas David Chaffin, Jeff Pummill, Pawel Wolinski, Timothy "Ryan" Rogers (student)  
University of Arkansas at Little Rock Albert Everett  
University of California Merced Sarvani Chadalapaka, Robert Romero    
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University of California-Davis Bill Broadley, Timothy Thatcher    
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University of California-Los Angeles TV Singh    
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University of Chicago Igor Yakushin, Ryan Harden    
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University of Hawaii Gwen Jacobs, Sean Cleveland
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University of Houston-Downtown Hong Lin, Dexter Cahoy  
University of Idaho Lucas Sheneman  
University of Illinois Mao Ye (domain) , Rob Kooper (domain) , Dean Karres, Tracy Smith    
University of Illinois at Chicago Himanshu Sharma, Jon Komperda, Leonard Apanasevich  
University of Indianapolis Steve Spicklemire    
University of Iowa Ben Rogers, Sai Ramadugu, Adam Harding, Joe Hetrick, Cody Johnson, Genevieve Johnson, Glenn Johnson, Brendel Krueger, Kang Lee, Gabby Perez, Brian Ring, John Saxton, Elizabeth Leake, Giang Rudderham    
University of Kansas Riley Epperson  
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University of Louisiana at Lafayette Raju Gottumukkala  
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University of Maine System Bruce Segee, Steve Cousins, Michael Brady Butler (student)  
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University of Michigan Gregory Teichert , Shelly Johnson, Todd Raeker, Daniel Kessler (student)    
University of Minnesota Eric Shook (domain) , Ben Lynch, Joel Turbes, Doug Finley, Aneesh Venugopal (student), Charles Nyguyen    
University of Mississippi Medical Center Kurt Showmaker  
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University of Missouri-Kansas City Paul Rulis    
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University of North Carolina at Charlotte Christopher Maher    
University of North Dakota Aaron Bergstrom, David Apostal  
University of North Georgia Luis A. Cueva Parra , Yong Wei    
University of North Texas Charles Peterson, Damiri Young    
University of Notre Dame Dodi Heryadi, Scott Hampton    
University of Oklahoma Henry Neeman, Kali McLennan, Horst Severini, James Ferguson, David Akin, S. Patrick Calhoun, Jason Speckman  
University of Oregon Nick Maggio, Robert Yelle, Michael Coleman, Jake Searcy, Mark Allen    
University of Pennsylvania Gavin Burris    
University of Pittsburgh Kim Wong, Matt Burton, Fangping Mu, Shervin Sammak, Donya Ramezanian    
University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Ana Gonzalez
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University of Richmond Fred Hagemeister    
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University of South Dakota Ryan Johnson, Bill Conn  
University of South Florida-St Petersburg Tylar Murray    
University of Southern California Cesar Sul, Derek Strong, Andrea Renney, Tomasz Osinski, Marco Olguin    
University of Southern Mississippi Brian Olson , Gopinath Subramanian  
University of St Thomas William Bear, Keith Ketchmark, Eric Tornoe    
University of Tennessee - Knoxville Deborah Penchoff    
University of Tulsa Peter Hawrylak  
University of Utah Anita Orendt, Tom Cheatham (domain) , Brian Haymore    
University of Vermont Andi Elledge, Yves Dubief, Keri Toksu  
University of Virginia Ed Hall, Katherine Holcomb    
University of Washington Nam Pho    
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse David Mathias, Samantha Foley    
University of Wisconsin-Madison Todd Shechter    
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Dan Siercks, Darin Peetz    
University of Wyoming Bryan Shader, Dylan Perkins  
University of the Virgin Islands Marc Boumedine
Utah Valley University George Rudolph    
Valparaiso University Paul Lapsansky, Paul M. Nord, Nicholas S. Rosasco    
Vassar College Christopher Gahn    
Virginia Tech University James McClure, Alana Romanella, Srijith Rajamohan    
Washburn University Karen Camarda, Steve Black  
Washington State University Rohit Dhariwal, Peter Mills    
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Washington and Lee University Tom Marcais    
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Weill Cornell Medicine Joseph Hargitai    
Wesleyan University Henk Meij    
West Chester University of Pennsylvania Linh Ngo    
West Texas A & M University Anirban Pal    
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission Jack Smith  
West Virginia University Guillermo Avendano-Franco , Blake Mertz, Nathaniel Garver-Daniels  
West Virginia University Institute of Technology Sanish Rai  
Wichita State University Terrance Figy  
Williams College Adam Wang    
Winston-Salem State University Xiuping Tao  
Winthrop University Paul Wiegand  
Wofford College Beau Christ  
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Roberta Mazzoli, Richard Brey, Gretchen Zwart    
Yale University Andrew Sherman, Kaylea Nelson, Benjamin Evans, Sinclair Im (student)    
Youngstown State University Feng George Yu    

LAST UPDATED: May 3, 2021

 

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The new system, geared towards GPU computing, will be open for nationwide XSEDE allocations beginning in the Fall of 2021.

Delta, a $10 million National Science Foundation-funded advanced computing system housed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois, will soon be accessible to researchers across the country via XSEDE allocation.

Using a design that leverages graphics processing units (GPUs) in combination with CPU architectures well-suited for scientific computing, Delta will be particularly suited to evolving research needs that heavily rely on GPU-intensive activities. Once available, Delta will be the most performant GPU-based NSF resource, unlocking cutting-edge capabilities for researchers nationwide, regardless of location, via XSEDE.

"Everyone at NCSA is excited to get Delta up and operational for the NSF community," said Tim Boerner, Timothy Boerner, Deputy Project Director for both the XSEDE and Delta projects. "It is a very forward-looking system in a number of different ways, such as the focus on science gateways support, improved accessibility, the relaxed-POSIX file system we have planned, and of course the massive amount of GPU computing performance this system will add to the XSEDE allocations pool."

Delta's first allocations are expected to be made during the June XSEDE Resource Allocation Committee (XRAC) meeting, with jobs scheduled to go into production in Fall of 2021. Delta was one of five NSF-funded systems awarded last summer, all of which will be partially allocated by XSEDE.

Read more about Delta below, and dive into the system's specifications here.

NCSA will integrate Delta into the national cyberinfrastructure ecosystem through the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment and partner with the Science Gateways Community Institute to provide platform access serving a broad range of needs. Boasting a non-POSIX file system with a POSIX-like interface, Delta allows applications to reap the benefits of modern file systems without rewriting code. And the Delta team will advance accessibility, providing greater usability of the interfaces by the widest possible audience, and in helping emerging research areas, such as computational archaeology and digital agriculture, take advantage of new computing methods.

Delta will provide ample professional development opportunities to adapt research applications to more optimally use its key features. Researchers who currently have GPU projects or are considering migrating to GPU architectures will find ready assistance in migrating the work to Delta.



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A different image

It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is that it has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using 'Content here, content here', making it look like readable English. Many desktop publishing packages and web page editors now use Lorem Ipsum as their default model text, and a search for 'lorem ipsum' will uncover many web sites still in their infancy. Various versions have evolved over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on purpose (injected humour and the like).

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Words matter. XSEDE's commitment to fostering and promoting an inclusive environment for all users, staff, and the wider community extends to all language and terminology in all of our materials. We encourage you to reach out to the XSEDE Terminology Task Force  with any feedback, recognizing that some third-party materials may be beyond our editorial control.


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Student Champions

Campus Champions programs include Regional, Student, and Domain Champions.

 

Student Champions

Student Champion volunteer responsibilities may vary from one institution to another and depending on your Campus Champion Mentor. Student Champions may work with their Mentor to provide outreach on campus to help users access the best advanced computing resource that will help them accomplish their research goals, provide training to users on campus, or work on special projects assigned by your Mentor. Student Champions are also encouraged to attend the annual PEARC conference and participate in the PEARC student program as well as submit posters or papers to the conference. 

To join the Student Champions program, the Campus Champion who will be their mentor should send a message to info@campuschampions.org to recommend the student for the program and confirm their willingness to be the student's mentor. 

Questions? Email info@campuschampions.org.

 

 

 
INSTITUTION CHAMPION MENTOR FIELD OF STUDY DESIGNATION GRADUATION 
Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical University Georgianna Wright Damian Clarke Computer Science Undergraduate 2022
Claremont Graduate University Cindy Cheng Jeho Park Information Systems & Technology Graduate 2022
Claremont Graduate University Michael Espero Asya Shklyar Biostatistics, Neurocognitive Science Graduate 2021
Claremont McKenna College Zeyad Elkelani Jeho Park Political Science Graduate 2021
Dillard University Priscilla Saarah Tomekia Simeon Biology Undergraduate 2022
Dillard University Brian Desil Tomekia Simeon Physics Undergraduate 2021
Drexel University Cameron Fritz David Chin Computer Science Undergraduate 2023
Drexel Univeristy Hoang Oanh Pham 
Hoang Oanh Pham
Computer Science Undergraduate 2023
Florida A&M Univerisity Rodolfo Tsuyoshi F. Kamikabeya Hongmei Chi Computer Information Science Graduate 2021
Florida A&M Univeristy Emon Nelson Hongmei Chi Computer Science Graduate 2021
Georgia Institute of Technology Sebastian Kayhan Hollister Semir Sarajlic Computer Science  Undergraduate 2021
Georgia Institute of Technology Siddhartha Vemuri Semir Sarajlic Computer Science Undergraduate 2021
Georgia State University Kenneth Huang Suranga Naranjan   Graduate 2021
Georgia State University  Melchizedek Mashiku Suranga Naranjan Computer Science Undergraduate 2022
Howard University Christina McBean Marcus Alfred Physics & Mathematics Undergraduate 2021
Howard University Tamanna Joshi Marcus Alfred Condensed Matter Theory Graduate 2021
Indiana University Ashley Brooks Carrie Ganote Physics Graduate 2025
John Hopkins University Jodie Hoh Jaime Combariza, Anthony Kolasny, Kevin Manalo Computer Science Undergraduate 2022
Kansas State University Mohammed Tanash Dan Andresen Computer Science Gradudate 2022
Massachusetts Green HPC Center Abigail Waters  Julie Ma Clinical Psychology Graduate 2022
North Carolina State University Yuqing Du Lisa Lowe Statistics Graduate  2021
Northwestern University  Sajid Ali Alper Kinaci Applied Physics Graduate 2021
Oregon State University McKenzie Hughes CJ Keist Biology Undergraduate 2021
Pomona College Nathaniel Getachew Asya Shklyar Computer Science & Mathematics Undergraduate 2023
Pomona College Omar Zintan Mwinila-Yuori Asya Shklyar Computer Science Undergraduate  2022
Pomona College Samuel Millette Asya Shklyar Computer Science  Undergraduate   2023
Prairie View A&M University Chara Tatum Suxia Cui Computer Science Undergraduate 2021
Prairie View A&M University Kobi Tioro Suxia Cui Computer Engineering Undergraduate 2021
Prairie View A&M University Racine McLean Suxia Cui Computer Engineering Undergraduate 2021
Prairie View A&M University Virgie Leyva Suxia Cui Computer Engineering Undergraduate 2021
Reed College Jiarong Li Trina Marmarelli Math-Computer Science Undergraduate 2021
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute James Flamino Joel Geidt   Graduate 2022
Saint Louis University Frank Gerhard Schroer IV Eric Kaufmann Physics Undergraduate 2021
Southern Illinois University

Majid Memari

Chet Langin   Graduate 2021
Southern Illinois University Manvith Mali Chet Langin Computer Science Graduate 2021
Southwestern Oklahoma State University Arianna Martin Jeremy Evert Computer Science & Music Performance Undergraduate 2023
Southwestern Oklahoma State University Kurtis D. Clark Jeremy Evert Computer Science Undergraduate 2020
Texas Tech University Misha Ahmadian Tom Brown Computer Science Graduate  2022
The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga  Carson Woods Tony Skjellum Computer Science Undergraduate 2021
University of Alabama at Birmingham Shahram Talei

John-Paul Robinson

Physics Graduate 2021
University of Arizona Alexander Prescott Blake Joyce Geosciences Graduate 2021
Univerity of Arkansas Timothy "Ryan" Rogers Jeff Pummill Physical Chemistry Graduate 2021
University of Central Oklahoma Samuel Kelting Evan Lemley Mathematics/CS Undergraduate 2021
University of Delaware Parinaz Barakhshan Anita Schwartz Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate 2024
University of Maine Michael Brady Butler Bruce Segee Physica/Computational Materials Science Graduate 2022
University of Michigan Daniel Kessler Shelly Johnson Statistics Graduate 2022
University of Minnesota Aneesh Venugopal Ben Lynch Electrical Engineering Graduate 2021
University of Missouri Ashkan Mirzaee Predrag Lazic Industrial Engineering Graduate 2021
University of Nebraska Natasha Pavlovikj Adam Caprez Computer Science Graduate 2021
University of North Carolina Wilmington Cory Nichols Shrum Eddie Dunn      
University of South Dakota Adison Ann Kleinsasser   Computer Science Graduate 2020
University of Texas at Dallas Namira Pervez

Jaynal Pervez

Neuroscience Undergraduate 2024
University of Wyoming Rajiv Khadka Jared Baker   Graduate 2020
Yale University Sinclair Im Andy Sherman Applied Math Graduate 2022
           
GRADUATED          
Boise State University Mike Henry Kyle Shannon     2020
Florida A&M Univerisity George Kurian Hongmei Chi     2019
Florida A&M Univerisity Temilola Aderibigbe Hongmei Chi     2019
Florida A&M Univerisity Stacyann Nelson Hongmei Chi     2019
Georgia State University Mengyuan Zhu Suranga Naranjan     2017
Georgia State University Thakshila Herath Suranga Naranjan     2018
Iowa State University Justin Stanley  Levi Barber     2020
Jackson State Univeristy Ebrahim Al-Areqi Carmen Wright     2018
Jackson State University Duber Gomez-Fonseca Carmen Wright     2019
Midwestern State University Broday Walker Eduardo Colmenares     2020
Mississippi State University Nitin Sukhija Trey Breckenridge     2015
New Jersey Institute of Technology Vatsal Shah Roman Voronov     2020
North Carolina State University Dheeraj Kalidini Lisa Lowe     2020
North Carolina State University Michael Dacanay Lisa Lowe      
Oklahoma State University Phillip Doehle Dana Brunson     2016
Oklahoma State University Venkat Padmanapan Rao Jesse Schafer     2019
Oklahoma State University Raj Shukla Dana Brunson     2018
Oklahoma State University Nathalia Graf Grachet Philip Doehle     2019
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Jorge Alarcon Joel Geidt     2016
Southern Illinois University Aaron Walber Chet Langin     2020
Southern Illinois University Alex Sommers Chet Langin     2018
Southern Illinois University Sai Susheel Sunkara Chet Langin     2018
Southern Illinois University Monica Majiga Chet Langin     2017
Southern Illinois University Sai Sandeep Kadiyala  Chet Langin     2017
Southern Illinois University Rezaul Nishat Chet Langin     2018
Southern Illinois University Alvin Gonzales Chet Langin     2020
Texas A&M University - College Station Logan Kunka Jian Tao     2020
Tufts University Georgios (George) Karamanis Shawn G. Doughty     2018
University of Arkansas Shawn Coleman Jeff Pummill     2014
University of California - Merced Luanzheng Guo Sarvani Chadalapaka     2020
University of Central Florida Amit Goel Paul Weigand      
University of Florida David Ojika Oleksandr Moskalenko     2018
University of Illinois at Chicago Babak Kashir Taloori Jon Komperda     2021
University of Iowa Baylen Jacob Brus Ben Rogers     2020
University of Houston Clear Lake Tarun Kumar Sharma Liwen Shih     2014
University of Houston-Downtown Eashrak Zubair Hong Lin     2020
University of Maryland Baltimore County Genaro Hernadez Paul Schou     2015
University of Michigan Simon Adorf Shelly Johnson     2019
University of Missouri Alexander Barnes Timothy Middelkoop     2018
University of North Carolina Wilmington James Stinson Gray Eddie Dunn     2018
University of Pittsburgh Shervin Sammak Kim Wong     2016
University of South Dakota Adison Ann Kleinsasser       2020
University of South Dakota Joseph Madison Doug Jennewein     2018
University of Wyoming Rajiv Khadka Jared Baker     2020
Virginia Tech University David Barto Alana Romanella     2020
Virginia Tech University Lu Chen Alana Romanella     2017
West Chester University of Pennsylvania Jon C. Kilgannon Linh Ngo     2020
Winston-Salem State University Daniel Caines Xiuping Tao     2019

Updated: March 25, 2020

 

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Initial report uses simulation on XSEDE resource for a finer-scale look at stresses leading to TBI

By Ken Chiacchia, Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

 

The scientists' simulation of damage-causing strain to brain tissues for sudden movements in the coronal direction (swaying the head from shoulder to shoulder). When using a measure that captured strain in any direction (MPS, in figure a), the estimated damage (red) was more extensive than a measure that took into account the direction of nerve fibers (MAS, b).

Whether from auto collisions, sports impacts, battlefield injuries, or other causes, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death. More than 150 people in the U.S. die each day from injuries that include TBI, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Engineers could design better ways of protecting us from TBI if we understood better how sudden shocks to the head translate to damage to nerve fibers in the brain. 

A team led by Robert Morris University used the XSEDE-allocated Bridges platform at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) to simulate head injuries at a higher level of detail and under more conditions than before, identifying key factors in causing strain to brain tissues.

Why It's Important

Whether you're a professional athlete, a military serviceperson in combat or a member of the general public, you need to protect your head. A mountain of evidence now supports the idea that what doctors might once have dismissed as a "minor concussion"—or even shocks to the head causing no obvious injury—can cause silent damage to the brain. After time, especially if it happens more than once, this silent damage can build. The end result can be a number of symptoms including loss of coordination, memory problems, seizures, and even death.

We're part of a very large collaborative team [across nine universities] funded through the Office of Naval Research … It's a great group, because everybody works on different aspects of traumatic brain injury, from in-vitro studies of nerve cells to helmet design to my focus, which is computational modeling.—Rika Carlsen, Robert Morris University

Despite a lot of research to understand TBI, we're still in the early days of unraveling its mysteries. Previous methods for estimating damage to the brain just aren't detailed or comprehensive enough. 

Rika Carlsen, Robert Morris University

That's why Rika Carlsen of Robert Morris University and colleagues at Brown University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison performed one of the most detailed and thorough series of computational simulations of brain injury to date to identify the type of head motions that are the most injurious. To run the massive, repeated simulations needed to tease out important factors for brain injury, they turned to the XSEDE-allocated Bridges platform at PSC.

How XSEDE Helped

Carlsen's team used finite element analysis (FEA) to simulate the brain being stressed by a number of movements. This method splits the brain into pieces, so that the computer can do the math on individual pieces and then assemble these pieces into the whole brain. FEA is a way of approximating the entire brain. It's not an exact solution, but reduces the size of the computation so it's possible with modern supercomputers.

While previous FEA simulations of brain injuries were in three dimensions, computing limitations forced them to split the brain into a small number of relatively large pieces. By splitting the brain into two-dimensional slices with 10,000 pieces, Carlsen's team was able to incorporate a high level of anatomical detail into their models without a significant increase in the computational cost. They used this 2D simulation to look at how abrupt angular motions of the head—sagittal, as if nodding "yes"; axial, or shaking the head "no"; or coronal, swaying the head from shoulder to shoulder—affected the strain on nerve fibers. This allowed a finer resolution. They also repeated these simulations about 600 times, changing a number of factors to see how the virtual brain's tissues were stressed in each "injury." 

Bridges offered the power and speed that they needed for these repeated large simulations. The system also provided access to the commercial engineering software Abaqus, which meant that the researchers would not have to reprogram the FEA algorithms.

XSEDE helped me build upon the resources that we have at RMU, allowing me to run a large-scale computational study like this one. The ability via Bridges to be able to submit jobs and run through a large number of parameters, conducting simulations in sequence, is on its own a big advantage. It just sped up the research process.—Rika Carlsen, Robert Morris University

The simulations identified both angular velocity (how fast the head is moving at an angle) and angular acceleration (the rate at which that velocity is increasing) as being important for predicting strain on brain tissues. 

Mapping their predictions to clinical measurements in papers by other researchers, Carlsen and her collaborators found that concussive sports injuries generally have higher predicted strain and strain rate in the brain than sports impacts that didn't cause concussion. This was an important real-life test that their simulations are on the right track. But the scientists will have to carry out more work to predict the extent of brain injury accurately.  There may be other important factors or combinations of factors the scientists weren't simulating, which will be the focus of future work.

Different parts of the brain may be affected differently by the same movements. The nerve fibers in the white matter of the brain are more or less aligned in parallel but the gray matter does not contain aligned fibers. A measure of strain that takes these directions into account—called maximal axonal strain, or MAS—may be a better gauge of brain damage for the white matter. On the other hand, a simpler measure that takes into account the maximum strain in any direction—maximum principal strain, MPS—may capture damage to the gray matter adequately. In the Bridges simulations, using MAS versus MPS predicted different extents of damage from the same head movements. Future investigation will determine when each measure is appropriate.

The team reported their results in the journal Brain Multiphysics in March 2021, which you can read here. Their initial findings encourage Carlsen and her colleagues that rapid prediction of brain injury with computational head models will be possible, offering engineers critical data on what kinds of shocks to the head their protective measures need to guard against. Upcoming work will include taking their detailed model to three dimensions, possibly simplifying the calculations using artificial intelligence on a more advanced computer such as PSC's new Bridges-2 platform, which just entered XSEDE-allocated production operations.

At a Glance

  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of disability and death in the U.S.

  • Engineers could design better ways of protecting us from TBI if we understood better how sudden shocks to the head translate to damage to nerve fibers in the brain.

  • A team led by Robert Morris University used the XSEDE-allocated Bridges platform at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) to simulate head injuries at a higher level of detail and under more conditions than before, identifying key factors in causing strain to brain tissues.


XSEDE-allocated Comet and Bridges systems run thousands of simulations for orbit study

By Kimberly Mann Bruch, SDSC Communications

 

Comet provided researchers with a large number of cores so that they could run more than 6000 simulations related to the spacing of Jupiter and Saturn.

They found that Jupiter and Saturn most likely formed with Jupiter making two orbits for every one of Saturn's, rather than a resonance of three Jupiter orbits for every two of Saturns, which most previous studies had assumed. Credit: NASA

The solar system's two largest planets, Jupiter and Saturn, received worldwide publicity on December 21, 2020, as they glided closer than they've been since 1623. Visible around the globe, "The Great Conjunction" placed the two planets only 0.1 degree apart from one another.

Typically, however, Jupiter and Saturn have been known to "keep their distance" from one another. And, understanding why these two planets have so much space between them was the focus of an Icarus journal article earlier this month. Born Eccentric: Constraints on Jupiter and Saturn's Pre-Instability Orbits encompassed the analysis of supercomputer simulations by an international team of researchers – thanks to allocations from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego and Bridges at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center were used to run more than 6000 simulations to better understand the space between Jupiter and Saturn. The simulations' development and analyses was led by Carnegie Institution of Washington Postdoctoral Fellow Matthew Clement, who teamed with astronomer Sean Raymond of the Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux and several researchers from the University of Oklahoma, Rice University, and the Southwest Research Institute.

"We are fairly certain that the giant planets, including Jupiter and Saturn, were born closer together than they are today and one challenge to determine how and why they are now so far apart is to better understand how Jupiter's orbit became so eccentric and elliptical (non-circular)," said Clement. "Historically, simulations that reproduce Jupiter's orbital shape tend to push Saturn too far out in to the outer solar system, beyond where Uranus is today, so with our study, we used initial conditions consistent with hydrodynamical models of the giant planets forming in gaseous proto-planetary disks to more consistently generate Jupiter and Saturn-like orbits."

XSEDE really opens up all kinds of possibilities in terms of being able to investigate complex problems and new ideas – these resources provide an invaluable contribution to my field of science. - Matthew Clement, Carnegie Institution of Washington Postdoctoral Fellow

While previous studies have assumed that Jupiter and Saturn were born in what is known as a 3:2 mean motion resonance (Jupiter went around the Sun three times for every two Saturn cycles), Clement's research considered an initial 2:1 resonance (two Jupiter orbits for every one of Saturn's). Thus, the planets formed further apart.

"This is the best way to explain the planets' modern orbital dance," he said. "Interestingly, perhaps the best observed photo-planetary disk, known as PDS-70, a system of planets in the process of growing, seems to be dominated by two giant planets similar to Jupiter and Saturn in our own solar system also in a 2:1 resonance."

Understanding how Jupiter and Saturn acquired their orbital shapes and mutual spacing may not seem like that big of a deal, but it turns out that the interplay of these two gas giants' orbits drive a good amount of the solar system's evolution as a whole. Jupiter itself makes up about two-thirds of all the total mass in planets, asteroids, and comets in the solar system. Meanwhile, Saturn comprises the majority of the rest of the material.

"The orbital dance that Jupiter and Saturn perform today drive a myriad of dynamical effects in the solar system, and likely affected the Earth's growth in the past," explained Clement. "This helps us understand why Earth is a nice temperate and water-rich place where we can live, while Mars and Venus are quite inhospitable to life as we know it."

Understanding Jupiter and Saturn in this manner also helps us compare our own system of planets to the large contingent of discovered exoplanets. Clement said that if we were observing our own solar system from afar, with current techniques, we would only be able to detect Jupiter and Saturn – not any of the other planets. However, when we look at the population of planets detected so far with masses similar to that of Jupiter and Saturn, their orbits look nothing like those in the solar system.

Our work essentially tries to understand why we appear to be the ‘missing link' between these two types of systems, and our results indicate that this is because of Jupiter and Saturn formed in the 2:1 resonance rather than a more compact chain like the 3:2. Because this is such a highly chaotic process, we would not have been able to take our project to this scale of thousands of simulations without Comet and Bridges. -- Matthew Clement, Carnegie Institution of Washington Postdoctoral Fellow

Some systems host Jupiter-like planets on very short orbits, closer to the Sun than Mercury (the so-called hot Jupiters). Others host Jupiter and Saturn-like planets on more distant orbits (like those of the actual Jupiter and Saturn), however their orbital eccentricities are extremely high (only comets have orbits this extreme in our solar system).  There are also a few systems with four or more giant planets on wide orbits with low eccentricities like our giant planets, but they are in a chain of resonances. So, the solar system exists in the curious "middle ground" between those last two types of systems.  

"Our work essentially tries to understand why we appear to be the ‘missing link' between these two types of systems, and our results indicate that this is because of Jupiter and Saturn formed in the 2:1 resonance rather than a more compact chain like the 3:2," said Clement. "Because this is such a highly chaotic process, we would not have been able to take our project to this scale of thousands of simulations without Comet and Bridges."

"The computational resources available to us through XSEDE were key to the success of our project, which I learned about through our campus champion Floyd Fayton," concluded Clement. "XSEDE really opens up all kinds of possibilities in terms of being able to investigate complex problems and new ideas – these resources provide an invaluable contribution to my field of science."

Key funding for this research was provided by the National Science Foundation grant AST-1615975, NSF CAREER award 1846388, the NASA Astrobiology Institute solicitation NNH12ZDA002C and cooperative agreement number NNA13AA93A, and NASA grant 80NSSC18K0828. Time on Comet and Bridges were awarded via XSEDE allocation TG-AST200004.

At a Glance

  • XSEDE allocations were used to run more than 6000 simulations on Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego and Bridges at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center to better understand the space between Jupiter and Saturn.
  • Earlier studies assumed that Jupiter and Saturn were born in a 3:2 mean motion resonance (Jupiter went around the Sun three times for every two Saturn cycles), but this new research considered an initial 2:1 resonance (two Jupiter orbits for every one of Saturn's).
  • Detailed results of the study were published in an article entitled Born Eccentric: Constraints on Jupiter and Saturn's Pre-Instability Orbits in the Icarus journal.