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XSEDE IMPACT JANUARY 2017

 

VIDEO: Designing safer buildings against natural hazards

Natural hazards engineers have lacked the cyberinfrastructure necessary to push their collaborative research to the next level—a level where computing resources and relevant, up-to-date models are easier to access for earthquake-mitigating research. Ellen Rathje, civil engineering professor at the University of Texas at Austin, leads a project that's developing this infrastructure, Design Safe-Cyber Infrastructure. She's modeling the project's computational expert support for researchers using the infrastructure after XSEDE's Extended Collaborative Support Services (ECSS), which pairs researchers with computational experts that work across different research groups.  Read more >>

VIDEO: Designing safer buildings against natural hazards
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Three decades of making impossible research possible

In 1985/1986, the National Science Foundation (NSF) committed to "making impossible research possible" by funding five supercomputer centers. These centers, which celebrated their 30th anniversaries in 2016, have served as cornerstones of the nation's high-performance computing and communications strategy. To make sure these centers and the resources they deployed were knit together into a unified whole, NSF also made major investments in programs like the Partnerships for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (1997-2004), TeraGrid (2005-2010) and most recently the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) (2011-present).  Read more >>

Three decades of making impossible research possible
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VIDEO: The science of jet noise

Using XSEDE, Daniel Bodony, the Blue Waters Associate Professor in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is looking into the science surrounding the aeroacoustics of jet engines and researching how to make them quieter. Watch the video as Bodony explains his methods.  Read more >>

VIDEO: The science of jet noise
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Modeling the perfect classroom

Supercomputers have been used to model intricate biological cells and the greater cosmos, but now XSEDE resources and help services are helping school teachers and administrators figure out how to help their students learn. The Stampede supercomputer, housed at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas at Austin, along with XSEDE's help service called Extended Collaborative Support Service (ECSS), allowed a research team to analyze "school tracking."  Read more >>

Modeling the perfect classroom
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PEARC17 to welcome HPC community

The annual XSEDE conference is transforming to an independent entity designed to unite the HPC and advanced digital research community. The Practice & Experience in Advanced Research Computing (PEARC) conference will welcome all who care about using advanced digital services for research at PEARC17 in New Orleans, July 9-13, 2017.  Read more >>

PEARC17 to welcome HPC community
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XSEDE EMPOWER

An XSEDE-wide effort is underway to expand the HPC community by recruiting and enabling a diverse group of students who have the skills - or are interested in acquiring the skills - to participate in the actual work of XSEDE. The name of this effort is XSEDE EMPOWER (Expert Mentoring Producing Opportunities for Work, Education, and Research). We invite the whole XSEDE community - staff, researchers, and educators - to recruit and mentor undergraduate students to engage in a variety of XSEDE activities, such as computational and/or data analytics research and education in all fields of study, networking, system maintenance and support, and visualization.   Read more >>

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VIDEO: Bridges AI playing poker

Four of the world's best professional poker players will match wits with an artificial intelligence developed by Carnegie Mellon University and using XSEDE's Bridges system, located at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. The epic rematch will determine whether a computer can beat humans playing poker, a "limited information game" important as a stand-in for real-world problems featuring opponents who are hiding information.  Read more >>

VIDEO: Bridges AI playing poker
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DCL: Share your thoughts on future cyberinfrastructure needs

The National Science Foundation released a Dear Colleague Letter asking for members of the science and advanced cyberinfrastructure communities to provide input that "provides a holistic view of the future needs for advanced cyberinfrastrucutre for advancing the Nation's research enterprise. Input is due by April 5, 2017.  Read more >>

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Events

PEARC17 - New Orleans, July 9-13, 2017

SC17-Nov. 13-16, 2017 | Booth #225