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January 2020 IMPACT

Boron carbide is one of the hardest materials on earth, yet it's also very lightweight, which explains why it has been used in making vehicle armor and body protection for soldiers.

December 2019 IMPACT

Iron, one of the most abundant elements in the universe, is most typically found in gaseous form in stars such as the sun and in a more condensed form in planets such as Earth.

November 2019 IMPACT

Over the past few years, offshore wind farms have emerged across the world as a viable source of energy.

XSEDE IMPACT OCTOBER 2019

Screening mammography is an important tool against breast cancer, but it has its limitations. A "normal" screening mammogram means that a woman doesn't have cancer now. But doctors wonder whether "normal" images contain clues about a woman's risk of developing breast cancer in the future.

IMPACT SEPTEMBER 2019

This may come as a shock, if you're moving fast enough. The shock being shock waves. Far out in the cosmos, a collapsing star generates shock waves from particles racing near the speed of light as the star goes supernova.

XSEDE IMPACT AUGUST 2019

Smaller electronic components offer us more power in our pockets. But thinner and thinner components pose engineering problems.

XSEDE IMPACT JULY 2019

The move toward cleaner, cheaper energy would be much easier if we had more powerful, safer battery technologies.

XSEDE IMPACT June 2019

XSEDE-allocated resources power population genomics study Comet, Jetstream, Bridges run millions of genomic simulations assisted by the Open Science Grid

XSEDE IMPACT MAY 2019

Thanks in part to simulations carried out on resources allocated through XSEDE, a massive research collaboration played a vital role in laying the groundwork in the imaging of the M87 black hole. Through hydrodynamical simulations run on Stampede2 at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, a research team led by Dr. Charles Gammie at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was able to provide important analysis to the imaging process, building theoretical models for researchers to use as...

XSEDE IMPACT APRIL 2019

Supercomputers Help Supercharge Protein Assembly. Using supercomputers, scientists are just starting to design proteins that self-assemble to combine and resemble life-giving molecules like hemoglobin. Through computation time awarded by XSEDE, a science team has designed proteins that self-assemble to combine and resemble life-giving molecules like hemoglobin.